Website Updating Report #3

Are you braced for more bad news?  Actually, most of the following stories are pretty upbeat.   I’ve been pounding away here.  I’m about halfway through this grueling winter project.  After this post, I have just five sections to go but they are the biggest and comprise about half of my website:  theatres, gas stations, eateries, mid-century, and signs.   I have about 2,700 pages at my website at this point.  I’m not counting the number of photos but I know it’s over 60,000 (the last time I counted).

So, here are some highlights (lowlights?) from four sections. As always, the photos were taken by me, the “news” snippets are courtesy Google StreetView Maps.

CAR SHOWROOMS

The Connell Motor Company building in Oakland, California is still there.  Sort of.  It still had the 1947 look in 2008 (well, those signs were not original — originally just “Connell” around the roof lip):

 

By 2014 — repainted & other plastic backlit signs:

 

And now (as of  this May map), the overwhelming and ghastly apartment building behind was completed.  I guess that sign is a retro attempt (backlit plastic letters):

Capture.JPG

 
“Startling” remodeling is not confined to California.  Here’s what recently happened to this former dealership in Bad Axe, Michigan.  I would guess built in the 1920s.  Nice stairstep brick typical of many dealerships from that time.  My photo from 2011:

It still looked like that in 2015 but as of this new 2018 map, this is what’s happened to it.  Backlit plastic letters now read “Flannery Auto Mall”:

Capture.JPG

 

GIANTS

Maybe you have already heard, Magic Forest in Lake George, New York has been re-themed and the owner sold off most of the fiberglass 1960s-era statues (dozens of people & animals) at the end of last year.  The bad news is that you won’t be able to see the variety all in one place any more.  The good news is that most of the statues have gone to loving homes and they are being restored.

One happy story is the nearly 40-foot-tall Uncle Sam statue (produced by International Fiberglass) which was originally installed at the Danbury Fair in Danbury, Connecticut is now back in Danbury at the Railway Museum.


Here he is installed in July, after being restored — photo from this publication:
http://hatcityblog.blogspot.com/2019/07/uncle-sam-returns-to-danbury.html

Capture

Missing now — this nice wood-carved statue of Jim Bridger in Lander, Wyoming.  He was installed in front of a liquor store around 2000.  By 2018, the store and the statue were gone.  I hope he’s safe somewhere.

Also gone now:  this Pirate that was in Breinigsville, Pennsylvania.  It was a matter of time, I suppose.  He stood in front of the Terry Hill Waterpark which opened in the late 1960s and has been closed since 2013.  He was gone by 2018.  I sure hope someone has him and we see him somewhere again.

 

John Margolies photographed this statue at a mini golf in Hampton Beach, New Hampshire in 1984.  I have often wondered if this was the same statue or if there was more than one built:

Capture

 

GIANT ANIMALS

Naturally, a few classic rooster, cows, bulls, and other animal statue have disappeared.  But there are still lots of them out there.  Some special one-of-a-kind losses are harder to take.  Like this sweet spotted chicken in Bothell, Washington:

 

The giant Great Dane statue at Great Dane Trailers — has been moved from Savannah, Georgia to their Brazil, Indiana location:


From this article — restored and installed in November:
https://www.thebraziltimes.com/story/2563598.html

Capture

How about this frog in Fontana, Wisconsin from a long-lost mini golf.  One of my photos from 2011.  I was sure he was gonna be a goner.  I think those wood doors indicate that he was originally the little shack where you picked up your clubs and balls:


But he was declared a landmark and restored in 2012.  Just look how gorgeous he looks now.

Capture

 

This spotted cow (steer?) in Brookfield, Illinois was installed on the roof of a restaurant in town for decades.  My photo here from 2009.  By 2015, she (?) had been painted brown and white.


In 2018, the most recent restaurant had closed and the building was being remodeled.   The cow was removed lives on!   She is now displayed and loved on at the local farmers market.  From the Brookfield Farmers Market Facebook page:

Capture.JPG

 

The Hilltop Steak House in Saugus, Massachusetts had a whole herd of cow/bull statues:

They had been there since the 1960s:

But then in 2013, the restaurant closed.  The world-famous giant cactus sign was adapted for a strip mall.  But the cows had to go.  Luckily, at least three of them found their way to the MarketStreet mall in Lynnfield, Massachusetts:

Capture

 

What surprised me though as I surfed GoogleMaps to find those guys is the cow that’s now in the same mall in front of the J.P. Licks ice cream store.  I’m pretty sure that it didn’t come from Hilltop:

Capture.JPG

Note the world map painted on her side.  The only other cow I’ve ever seen like that was in Guelph, Ontario in front of a Lely Canada (robotic milking company) office.  By 2009, the statue and business were gone:

Could this be the same statue?  The paint job is a little different.  Were other cows painted like this originally?  For what business? A true mystery!

ART DECO & STREAMLINE MODERNE BUILDINGS

Last topic for this post.  My first “true love” wasn’t neon signs.  It was actually streamline moderne buildings.   I’ve always loved buildings.  As soon as I got my driver’s license when I was 16, I drove all over California every weekend, shooting every streamline moderne building in the AIA Guides for northern & southern CA.  Hundreds of them.  Those photos faded into nothingness and were trashed eventually.  But I guess the obsessive seed was planted at that time.

 

The General Motors Testing Laboratory building in Phoenix, Arizona is still there.  But the later addition sign (1953?) for the Imperial School Photography disappeared earlier this year.  I hope someone has it!

Two nice buildings in California were recently demolished.  Preservationist fought hard to save the Eugene C. Jones Veterinary Office from 1938 in West Hollywood.  Also, there’s a vacant lot there now:

 
A less historically significant building in Los Angeles (but I loved it just as much) was also demolished.  Vacant lot now. I don’t know what it housed originally but I always thought it had a lot of class.  I’m betting the bottom part was all continuous glass originally:

 
Hollywood High in Los Angeles was built in 1938 (after the previous building was demolished in the 1933 earthquake).  The buildings have lots of super details:  reliefs, borders, curves…

How on EARTH, did they allow this crap mural to be painted over the building last November?!?  “Hollywood High School recently unveiled a new community mural on campus created by Don Rimx One that celebrates the students’ diverse and collaborative spirit!”  Ugh.

Capture.JPG

 

At least that’s not as bad as a remodeling.  New paint can fix it one day.

 
Last subject for this post.  The Sears, Roebuck & Co. Building in Houston, Texas was remodeled into an unrecognizable, massive blob over the years.  From this in 1939:

Capture.JPG

 

To this by 2018:


But — see that black rectangle up there on the right?  That is/was a gorgeous red, porcelain enamel SEARS sign that was probably added in the 1950s.  Note the neon tubing overlay text that flashed, alternating with the Sears name and read “Open Til 9”.

 

When the store closed in 2018, the sign was, gasp, painted black.  The building is now being adapted for a “technology innovation center” and the sign is sitting on blocks across the street.  The owners aren’t sure what they’re going to do with it.  It’s massive so not exactly man-cave material.  So, we probably know what that means (scrapyard) or maybe re-lettered for the new building when it’s done.

Capture.JPG

 

 

That’s enough news for one post!  I’ll be back in a couple of weeks or so with more.

Happy trails!
dj & the dogs

 

Updating Report #2

Welcome back!   Here’s today’s second installment covering two sections at my website.  Let’s start with the Giant Stuff  section which covers many topics:  Musical Instruments, Body Parts, Fake Castles, Fake Lighthouses, Fake Ship Buildings, Giant Guns, etc.
http://www.roadarch.com/mim/a.html

One of the most devastating bits of bad news — Bo Pilgrim is no more.  The 37-foot-tall, fiberglass head at Pilgrim’s Pride in Pittsburg, TX is now in storage.  The chicken plant moved its headquarters to Greeley, CO and Bo’s family now has the head.  More photos & info about my website here:
http://www.roadarch.com/mim/body3.html#Pilgrim

 

This castle-ish building in Portland, OR was built in the 1930s as a church.  It later became a bar and had been Club 21 since 1958.  It was demolished around 2017.

 

This cute faux castle building in Cocoa Beach, FL…

… had lost most of its castle details by 2011 and then by last year, it was repainted and looked like every other boxy building.

In Cocoa, FL, this Pullman train cars restaurant driving into a fake cave was gone by sometime last year:

 

This Shoe House in Elk Grove, CA disappeared within the past year or so:

These Giant Scissors in Woodland Hills, CA were attached to the Wella Corporation building.  The company and the scissors were gone by last year or so:

 

This cute little lighthouse building in Deerfield, MA was built as a gas station in the 1920s or 1930s.  It was demolished a couple of years ago.  Devastating.

Another real punch to the gut — the Grand Guitar in Bristol, TN was demolished earlier this year despite its listing on the National Register of Historic Places:

Let’s move on to some signs from the SCA Journal Companion section:
http://www.roadarch.com/sca/main.html

From the Car Signs page – this sign in Rockport, IN is gone now:

 

From the Donut Signs subsection — this former Jolly Pirate Donuts sign in Columbus, OH seems to be gone now.  It was removed in 2018 for construction work.  But it’s still not back this year.

 

From the Plumbing Signs page — this store in Murray, UT relocated last year and the sign was removed.  It doesn’t seem to be at the new place:

 

And, lastly, two signs from the Pest Control Signs page.  This place in Memphis, TN closed and this sign is gone:

The Western Exterminator location in Burlingame, CA closed and the Big Man and Mouse were removed.  The sign was painted over.  The business owner isn’t sure if they will reinstall the statues at the new place.  Luckily, there are a few other examples of these statues on public display:
http://www.roadarch.com/sca/pest.html

That’s it for now.   I’ll be back in a week or two with more news.

Happy trails,

dj & the dogs

 

Site Updating Report #1

So, it’s that time of year.  Time to be thankful for all the wonderful places and things that miraculously survive out there.  And it’s time to share the mostly bad news about things that are no longer with us.  I’ve combed about 40% of my website since I posted last.  I still have the biggest 9 sections to go.  I’d love to power through and be done by the first of the year but we shall see.  Here then are some new “discoveries” courtesy of clicking & adjusting the GoogleStreetView links for every entry at my website.  The “before” photos are mine — the “afters” are snips from StreetView.

Let’s start with some good news from the Bottling Plants section:
http://www.roadarch.com/beverage/main.html

Here’s my photo of the former Canada Dry bottling plant in Minneapolis, MN built in 1946.  My photo from 2008 when it was looking pretty weary:

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

What a pleasant surprise to find out the building was restored and repurposed for the Hiawatha Collegiate High School in 2017:

Capture

 

 

The Coca-Cola plant in Salem, NH was hanging by a thread when I took this photo in 2011:

There were already plans to demolish the building in 2009.  BUT!  In 2015, the building was restored and repurposed as office/retail space.  The sign on the roof (that was originally a Coca-Cola sign) is gone now:

Capture

And in Indianapolis, IN, this huge & spectacular, Art Deco Coca-Cola bottling complex —

which had been used as a school bus maintenance and storage facility for many years… is being restored for a restaurant/entertainment/etc. “BottleWorks District” complex now:

Capture.JPG

 

Let’s move on to Drive-in Movie Theatres:
http://www.roadarch.com/driveins/1.html

The Kenwood Drive-in in Louisville, KY has been closed since 2009 but this sign had been hanging on:


Around 2014, the property was adapted for a business park.  The screentower was actually taken down and move to a drive-in in Georgetown, IN where it will be used as a backup.  The sign remains and was adapted.  No neon but hey!

Capture

The Springmill Drive-in in Mansfield, OH was look sad and rusty for years:

Then, last year, it got a makeover!  I’m so glad they kep the original look and lettering:

Capture.JPG

 

 

From the Bus Stations section:
http://www.roadarch.com/bus/1.html

This cool streamline moderne number in Brainerd, MN:

got an unfortunate, ugly makeover by last October:

Capture.JPG

 

 

From the Diners section:
http://www.roadarch.com/diners/1.html

The converted trolley car at Chris & Rob’s Chicago’s Taste Authority in St. Paul, MN:

got a bright paint job by this past June:

Capture.JPG

 

Some bad news from the Tire Stores section:
http://www.roadarch.com/tires/main.html

This nifty, mid-century Goodyear building (built as a Firestone in 1970) in Houston was demolished earlier this year for a new towering medical complex.  Ugh.

The Firestone in San Mateo, CA had a unique, giant glazed tile pylon.  Originally, both signs had neon.  By this past June, the signs were gone and the building was vacant.

Capture.JPG

 

From the Dinosaurs section:
http://www.roadarch.com/dinos/main.html

Some good news!  This statue in Bayville, NJ was built in 1925:

The statue has been battered and vandalized many times since then.  Its head hit and lopped off many times by passing trucks.  There was talk of restoring the statue for years and now it has finally happened!  GoogleStreetView still shows the empty platform from 2018 but this article from last December shows the statue’s miraculous restoration.  Note that his/her neck is now turned to the side a bit to protect it from traffic:

https://www.jerseyshoreonline.com/berkeley/bayvilles-dinosaur-the-roar-has-been-restored/

Capture

That’s enough for this post.  Another one coming up later today.

See ’em & shoot ’em while you can….

Happy trails,
dj & the dogs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Trip Wrap-up & Day 30 in NM

Here it is the final post from June’s trip.  At this point, on Day 30, I was racing towards home with one day ahead to sort out my life and then head back to work in SoCal.  But I managed some stops in Albuquerque and Gallup on the way home.

Before the final sampling of photos, here are the “stats” about the trip.  I put another 12,519 miles on Sparkle’s odometer (nearly 500,000 now).  That’s an average of about 417 miles per day.  I took more than 4,000 photos.  I spent $2231 on gas (about $74 per day).  Granted, Sparkle only gets about 17mpg but when you’re traveling with four dogs & you need the space for clothes, human/dog supplies & other stuff, you gotta suck that up.

I’ve got all of the 29 days’ photos up at my website (roadarch.com) which is my life’s work.  This blog is just a little diversion, a way to share photos that are usually not worthy of my website and document these trips.

I’ll get Day 30’s New Mexico photos up this weekend.  But all of the Oklahoma, Mississippi, Arkansas, Arizona, Louisiana, Texas, and Memphis photos are all up.  So, if you have a favorite state or topics (signs, mid-century modern buildings, Art Deco, bus stations, giant fruit or animals, gas stations, etc.), you might want to go see what’s new.  You can also use the search box below the yellow bar on the left at any page to search by cities to see things from all sections for them.

Now then — on with some of the final day’s photos.  All from Albuquerque.

blog1.jpg

blog2.jpg

blog3.jpg

blog4.jpg

blog5.jpg

 
The remaining photos from this post are all part of Carlos Garcia’s collection.  About half of his signs are from auctions from around the country, the other half is from Albuquerque with a few from other NM cities.   He’s a controversial figure in that some people believe that he gets his signs “too soon.”  That is, working out deals with the business owner or building at maybe the 9th hour instead of catching the sign just before it was about to hit the dumpster.  I’ve spoken with him a lot and it seems that every sign has a story and was truly about to come down “soon”.

He is working on a sign park of some sort in ABQ that should open to the public next year as part of the Glorieta Station development.  I’ve seen some of the artist illustrations of the plans.  In the meantime, the majority of his signs are displayed inside his event and storage space.  Some are at the back of a parking lot waiting for restoration and/or the sign park.  In any case, he’s happy to have lookie-loo sign-lovers come see his collection by appointment.  And then make judgments for themselves whether he’s to be loved or hated for this collection.

Personally, I’m somewhere in the middle: suspicious that at least some of the signs could have stayed up a few more years but happy that someone got them before a new business owner might repaint them with their name or add plastic letters to the panels which would be just as bad as the scrapheap.  I’ve seen that happen waaaaaay too many times.

blog6.jpg

blog7.jpg

blog8.jpg

blog9.jpg

blog10.jpg

blog13.jpg

blog12.jpg

blog14.jpg

blog15.jpg

 

Let’s end with one sign that’s now part from Carlos’ collection.  The Arrow Motel in Espanola, NM (first photo below is mine from 2012).  The motel was condemned years ago and demolished last year.  Everyone worried over what would become of the sign.  The city had no plans for it.  Carlos talked to the owners over the years and finally worked out a deal.  They only gave it or sold it (I can’t remember which) to him with the condition that he restore the sign to its original glory.

arrow-1
Well, the sign community, including me, was horrified by that…. ruining the historic patina…  but… anyway, here was the sign in June getting the full rust-removal and original paint colors.  The sign has since had the neon installed and the animated arrow is working again.

blog11.jpg

arrow.jpg
I hope you enjoyed the daily samplings from this trip.  I’ll be back soon enough with the next mega project.  Combing my website for all the changes over the past year via the Google Street View maps in the descriptions at my website.  Demolitions, repaints, removals, remodeling.  And then posting here the tragedies (mostly) and surprises (a little bit of positive news, let’s hope).  It’s going to my idea of “fun.”  During that, I’ll also make a few little North/South Calif. trips as a break over the next six months or so.  Then, it’ll be time to plan next year’s summer trip (Florida, Alabama, Georgia & more).  The cycle of life, DJ style.

Now, don’t forget to take a peek at other photos from this trip (different from the one’s posted to this blog) over at Flickr.  And then when you’ve got a good chunk of time, venture over to the website for the “real deal” (approaching or exceeding 3,000 – haven’t counted lately – packed pages of buildings, signs & statues).

Happy trails!
dj & the dogs – back home in paradise

dogs.jpg

Day 29: Mostly Oklahoma City

The clock was really ticking on this trip with only two days to go.  But I was determined to dip into OKC for a bit.  Let’s start off with a few signs on the outskirts in Midwest City.

This one is at the Highlight Laundry:

blog1.jpg

 

This sign has been modernized — and not in a good way.  The manual letter readerboard at the bottom is now an annoying digital display.  The neon has been replaced with really crude LED rope lighting:

blog2

 
The Planet Plaza Apartments name has changed but, thankfully, this sign has been saved.  I don’t know if it was always on the side of the building.  Might have been up front.  Might have had neon:

blog3.jpg

 

Moving on to OKC.  Ned’s opened around 2018 and this retro sign is from then:

blog4.jpg

 
This modern sign is at a Crest Foods supermarket.  I don’t think the neon or animation works anymore.  Still, I love this little caveman:

blog5.jpg

 
Simply spectacular — and so is the building:

blog6.jpg

 

I’m going to assume that this was a flashing two-part arrow with the wavy part  followed by the straight part:

blog6a.jpg

 
This sign which advertised for the Split-T Bar drive-in which closed in 2000.  The sign was shortened and adapted by Sonic and moved across the street.  Here’s what the sign looked like originally:
https://i.pinimg.com/originals/a6/6a/20/a66a203794451698dd14c7a930e34a99.jpg

blog6b.jpg

 
Moving on to Bethany.  This sign appears to be modern but it seems so odd with the diamond and palm tree.  Maybe it was reworked for this pool place which has been there since at least 2007:

blog7.jpg

 
Last stop before I hopped on the interstate for New Mexico.  This one is in El Reno:

blog8.jpg

 

Back next weekend with the final post and the big summary for this trip.

Happy trails,
dj & the dogs

Day 28: Oklahoma (mostly Tulsa)

Three more days for this trip. Most of this day was spent in Tulsa with glorious all day sun.  Let’s start off with this sign for the Westside Laundry in Tulsa.  The sign was probably a used car lot sign originally:

blog1.jpg

 
This is a modern sign:

blog2.jpg

This sign is “new” in that it’s a vintage sign but it installed sometime between 2007 and 2011 above a trendy bar:

blog3.jpg

 
This neon detail is installed above The Colony bar sign:

blog4.jpg

 
The Daylight Donuts sign in Tulsa originally advertised for Shaw’s Drive-in:
https://i.pinimg.com/originals/83/55/fe/8355fec0584dd8d7f59b85343f52b20d.jpg

At some point it was adapted for Daylight Donuts and then fell into really bad shape.  Here’s my photo from 2011:

ddonuts

 

In 2012, the neon bits were removed and it was repainted.  Horrible fonts and bizarre color choices.  But, hey, it’s still there, and there’s hope that maybe someday a true restoration might take place.

blog5.jpg

 
This shopping center sign was originally located in Springfield, MO.  It’s now part of the sign collection at the Stokely Event Center in Tulsa.  Here’s my photo when it was still in place in Missouri in 2010:

countrycl

and today:

blog6.jpg

 

The Earl M. Jorgensen Co. has about 40 locations across the country. There are at least two other identical signs to this one in Dallas, TX and Lynwood, CA.  They all have neon and composite letters like this.  However, at some point, the neon in the channel letters here were replaced with cheap & crappy LED rope tubing.

blog7.jpg

 
The neon letters on the facade are intact.

blog8.jpg

Are per Google StreetView, the Lynwood location also has a nice facade:

Capture

and the Dallas building has a nice mid-century modern vibe:

Capture.JPG

 

 

But back to Tulsa for some more signs:

blog9.jpg

blog10.jpg

blog11a.jpg

 

 

This is one of two of these signs that survive in Tulsa:

blog11.jpg

 

Here’s one of a dwindling population of Arby’s sign around the country. This is one of the smaller version:

blog12.jpg

But what’s even better:  a sign company maintaining the bulbs:

blog13.jpg

 
The last one for this post — moving on from Tulsa to Chandler:

blog14.jpg

 
Back with the final day of Oklahoma & some New Mexico in next weekend’s post.

Happy trails,
dj & the dogs

Day 27: Oklahoma (McAlester to Tulsa)

Three days of Oklahoma to share:  here’s post 1 of 3.

Let’s start with this sign in Eufala:

blog1.jpg

 

 

Another one from Eufala.  Simple but sweet.  Well-preserved corrugated plastic signs are getting very rare:

blog2.jpg

 

 

Some signs from Muskogee:

blog3.jpg

 

 

Another one for my Happy Bear collection:
http://www.roadarch.com/signs/bear.html

blog4.jpg

 

 

In 2011, this sign was prettier and still had its neon:

 
Here’s what it looks like now:

blog5.jpg

 

 

 

Gorgeous in this rusty state.  They are trying to raise money to restore it but I kinda hope that doesn’t happen.  Better yet, put a replica on the poles and move this guy into/on top of the building:

blog6.jpg

 

 

This cutie is in Tahlequah:

blog7.jpg

 

 

Another one from Tahlequah:

blog8.jpg

 

 

One of two C-152 Lectras across the street from each other in Chouteau.  This is the unrestored one:
http://www.roadarch.com/sca/roto4.html

blog9.jpg

 

 

 

This Daylight Donuts is in Verdigris — neon, bulbs, corrugated panels…

blog10.jpg

 

AND a vacuum form panel under the eaves.  I’m sure these were mass-produced but I’ve never seen another one anywhere:

blog11.jpg

 

 

Last one for this post — in Claremore.  This sign was restored in the past few years.  Here’s what it looked like in 2016:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/romleys/27263089305/

blog12

 

Back next weekend (or so) with more.

Happy trails,
dj & the dogs

Day 26: the Last of Arkansas

So, it was a cloudy day and I did what I could.  Someday, I’ll have to swing thru these cities again and reshoot.  But here’s a nice big batch anyway.

From Malvern, AR:

blog1.jpg

 

From Benton, AR (surely, some other Moderne “thing” originally with neon:

blog2.jpg

 
I’ve been anxious to reshoot this sign at the Magic Hills Public Golf course in Hot Springs for years.  Finally, I got a little sun but the fencing and trees have made it next to impossible:

blog3.jpg

 

Lots more from Hot Springs.   This one (Zac’s Pizza) has been missing any trace of paint since at least 2007:

blog4.jpg

This old drug store sign is inside an antiques store (store was local I was told).  Pretty beat but still beautiful.  Some neat other stuff there including an old Happy Bear Alignment sign:

blog5.jpg

A rusting shopping center sign:

blog6.jpg

“Stubby’s” looks like a replacement panel.  We can assume there was another log panel with somebody’s else’s name there:

blog7.jpg

There was originally white paint behind the letters.  I guess, at some point, the sign was repainted entirely red and it was deemed too much trouble to deal with the lettering:

blog8.jpg

 

The Bohemia sign is not looking good these days — but at least it’s back.  Sort of.  The restaurant has been closed since at least 2006.  It was still looking nice in my 2010 photo:

bohemia

Then, around 2014, the sign was covered up for a new venture: the Park Avenue Bistro — as evidenced at GoogleStreetView:

Capture

When that closed, the sign was uncovered again — missing the “B”and its neon — and bent a bit (during the panel removal process, hit by a truck?):

blog9.jpg

 

One more rusty-crusty from Hot Springs:

blog10.jpg

 

A “fancy” one from Royal, AR:

blog11.jpg

Last one for the day from, finally, Oklahoma!  This one is in McAlester:

blog12.jpg

 

I’ll have about three days worth of photos from Oklahoma coming up.  Then finish off this trip with a couple of posts from New Mexico.

Happy trails,
dj & the dogs

Day 25: More Arkansas

So, two more days of Arkansas photos.  And then another four days of Oklahoma and New Mexico after that.  We’re in the home stretch!  I’m on target to wrap things up here and at my website by November 1.

This will be a quick post since I got a late start in the morning due to clouds and, then, the day was cut short by serious rain commencing around 4pm.

This sign with the giant shotgun cartridge on top is located in Stuttgart:

blog2.jpg

 

A few signs from Pine Bluff.  This is the best I could do with this nice sign due to clouds & trees:

blog1.jpg

 

 

For the “reshoot in sun” list:

blog3.jpg

 

 

The sign below previously had neon and advertising for Irish Maid Do-Nuts:
https://www.rockcityeats.com/around-arkansas-irish-maid-donuts-in-pine-bluff/

At least the neon Irish Maid sign in Fort Smith still survives.

blog4.jpg

 

 

These liquor store signs are in Rison. I don’t think I’ve seen a vaccum form Schlitz sign like this in the wild before:

blog5.jpg

 

 

More liquor store signs — these in El Dorado:

blog6.jpg

 

 

Another sign from El Dorado.  This place is closed and I would imagine that this modern sign will probably be removed when another tenant moves in:

blog7

 

 

The last shot for the day from Magnolia at Wilson-Beardon Drugs.  This looks like either a refurbished or replica sign:

blog8.jpg

 

 

I’ll be back this weekend with the final Arkansas batch.  More photos from today over at the Flickr stream:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/agilitynut/

Happy trails,
dj & the dogs

Day 24: More Arkansas (Pt 3)

Let’s get back to Arkansas.  I’ve got a nice big batch of photos for you.

This place is in Clarksville:

blog1.jpg

From Russellville:

blog2.jpg

In Conway:

blog3.jpg

Around 2015, this Shipley Do-Nuts in North Little Rock was updated for Paul’s Donuts.  The sign is pretty tacky but at least it’s still there in spirt.  Here’s the “before” that I shot in 2008:

 

and the “after”:

blog5.jpg

 

The building “before”:

and now with the peaked roof addition:

blog4.jpg

 

 

The Koehler Bakery in North Little Rock is gone but the vitrolite facade remains:

blog6.jpg

 

The “lesser” sign at Argenta Drug in North Little Rock:

blog7.jpg

 
A couple more sign from North Little Rock:

blog8.jpg

blog9.jpg

 

 

From Little Rock — the Village Theatre sign remains but the great dome theatre building was demolished in 2015:

blog10

 

GolfWorld in Little Rock:

blog11

blog12.jpg

Two more signs from Little Rock — Torrence Flowers:

blog13.jpg

 
The Flying Fish sign is modern but it’s been there since at least 2007:

blog14.jpg

Let’s wrap up with this place from West Helena:

blog15

blog16.jpg

 

Two more days of Arkansas to go.  Another post next weekend.  In the meantime, don’t forget the prettier signs & interesting buildings from this day and earlier in the trip are over here at Flickr:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/agilitynut/

Happy trails,
dj & the dogs